東京都美術館× 東京藝術大学 「とびらプロジェクト」

ブログ

Archive for 7月 23rd, 2012

2012.07.23

The Practical Application Course “School Monday (Art Viewing through Conversation)” has started. The class invited Ms. Norie Mitsuki, an art planner of the non-profit organization Art Resources Development Association, as an instructor. Attendees learned about “Savoring Art Together – Viewing” while mixing in a practical approach.

First, there was a lecture given by the curator in charge of “School Monday,” Ms. Inaniwa, regarding the overview of this Practical Application Course and the current status of art viewing education in elementary and junior high schools.

School Monday is a program for school teachers and children started by the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum (hereafter: TOBI) spurred by the museum’s renovation in April 2012. On days when the Museum is closed, we offer special art viewings, which are difficult to offer at schools due to the high volume of regular museum visitors. Also, this program provides support for children to become the main focus and be able to view art while freely forming opinions and thoughts, and then sharing them with others through discussion.

In recent years, curriculum guideline levels have been revised in elementary and junior high schools. In elementary school arts and crafts and junior high school art classes, collaboration with museums and other places for art viewing activities is indicated more clearly than before. Therefore, we from the museum side are thinking of creating better art viewing opportunities by collaborating with schools as well. One of the specific programs is an art viewing class through “conversation.” Art viewing through conversation consists of forming groups of approximately 10 students and holding discussions. We will need facilitators to assist the conversations depending on the number of students. With the aim of the TOBIRAs doing this facilitator role in the near future, currently TOBIRA candidates (herein: TOBIKO) will build up a practical application training curriculum of 14 classes this year.

Finally, the class moved on to this course’s practical contents. From the instructor Ms. Mitsuki, there was a brief summary of the VTS (Visual Thinking Strategy), which is the center of art viewing through conversation.

This VTS (Visual Thinking Strategy) is a method used to deepen the way we look at art. We start by looking at a piece closely – not relying on any art history knowledge – and encouraging people to think individually, asking “What is it?” as a method to extract the various opinions. It has an effect of cultivating the viewers’ “ability to observe,” “ability to think critically,” and “ability to communicate.” It was developed and spread by Philip Yenawine, former Director of Education at the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York, and cognitive psychologist Abigail Housen. The foundation the VTS style of art viewing though conversation was introduced to Japan in the ’90s. You might think that looking at an art piece while talking to someone is a natural thing we do every day, but the point of this VTS method is to create a “conversation” constructed by opinions as opposed to simply having a “conversation.”

After the summary explanation, participants actually experienced the VTS. They looked closely at the paintings and sculptures and other things projected on the screen and spoke freely about what they had noticed and discovered with the assistance of Ms. Mitsuki as our facilitator. Various opinions were exchanged about things such as motifs of the pieces drawn and impressions they got from them.

The third piece viewed was the “Rules of the Forest” by Taro Okamoto, which is displayed at a current TOBI exhibition called “The Story of Tokyo Metropolitan Museum.” After viewing the piece on a screen, the TOBIKOs moved to the exhibition room and viewed the actually viewed the original. It seems like there were many discoveries separate from the screen viewing, and various opinions came out during the opinion-sharing discussion afterwards.

The VTS was developed in America, but since the land is so vast, there are many people who are unable to go to museums. An art viewing method that was created in this sort of situation utilizes slides and projects pieces on screens as participants did this time. There are many things that can be done with slides, but they realized one can view art in much greater depth when in front of the actual object.

After experiencing VTS, there was a more detailed summarization, including specific methods.

he key to VTS is the art viewing facilitators. They ask questions of the viewers and create a nice flow of discussion to prompt the sharing of opinions. For example, when the viewers are children, there are times that their language is insufficient to convey what they want to say. Understanding the true meaning of statements and paraphrasing them enables opinion-sharing with others. Also, one of the most important things facilitators do is they “stay neutral.” The VTS focuses on the process of “learning to think” rather than on one “correct answer.” The facilitators are required to treat each opinion raised as a possibility, rather than deciding it to be a conclusion. It is important for the viewers to express their opinions, and develop them to think about the art piece individually. Moreover, there is no organizing or summarizing of opinions at the end of viewings. You might think that this would produce some vagueness, but by verbalizing one’s own opinions objectively under a facilitator’s lead, the visitors will recognize and be receptive to others’ opinions and have a desire to generate meaning from what one is seeing at the moment. Essentially, this develops within the viewer the intrinsic thoughts of wanting to “know” and “understand” on their own. Moreover, if these spontaneous thoughts get stronger, instead of throwing vague questions at others to seek answers, the “ability to continue thinking independently” will grow.

Art is a difficult field to verbalize, but listening to others’ thoughts and the satisfying feeling of verbalizing one’s own thoughts and sharing them will nurture abilities like continuing to think and learn as well as observe. Also, the ability to communicate will develop. At the end of the Course, the participants formed groups of 3 and shared issues such as the Course experience and their opinions.

After the 14th Course, the TOBIKOs will have actual discussions with children. There will probably be many students that have never been to a museum. I am already looking forward to the day that the TOBIRAs spend fulfilling time with children by playing an active role as facilitators for art viewing through discussions. (Iku Ōtani , TOBI Gateway Project Assistant)

2012.07.23

「スクールマンデー(対話を通して作品を鑑賞)」の実践講座がスタートしました。この講座では、NPO法人芸術資源開発機構のアートプランナーである三ツ木紀英さんを講師としてお招きし、実践的な取り組みを交えながら「作品を共に味わう『鑑賞』」について学んでいきます。

まず、「スクールマンデー」担当学芸員の稲庭さんから、この実践講座の概要や小中学校における美術鑑賞教育の現状についてのお話がありました。

 

スクールマンデーとは、東京都美術館(以下「都美」)が、この平成24年4月のリニューアルを機に始められた学校の先生やこどもたちのためのプログラムで、普段は来館者も多いためなかなか行うことが難しい学校での鑑賞を、休室日に特別に開室し実践します。また、このプログラムはこどもたちとの対話を軸に、自由な意見や考えを持って周りと共有しながら、こどもたちが主体となって鑑賞できるようにサポートします。

^

近年、小中学校の学習指導要領が改訂され、小学校の図画工作、中学校の美術の授業で、美術館などと連携を図りながら鑑賞活動を行う事が以前にくらべて明確に示されるようになりました。そのため美術館側でも、よりよい鑑賞の機会を学校と連携しながら生み出していきたいと考えているのです。その具体的なプログラムの一つが「対話」を通した鑑賞の授業です。対話を通した鑑賞は、生徒が10名ぐらいずつグループになり対話をしていくため、生徒の数に合わせた、対話を助けるファシリテータが必要になります。このファシリテータ役を近い将来とびラーがすることをめざし、現在とびラー候補生(以下「とびコー」)は今年度14回の実践研修を積み重ねるのです。

 ^

そしていよいよこの講座の実践的な内容へ。講師の三ツ木さんより、対話を通した作品鑑賞の中心となるVTS(ヴィジュアル・シンキング・ストラテジー)についての簡単な概要説明がありました。

^

このVTS(ヴィジュアル・シンキング・ストラテジー)とは、美術史の知識に頼らず、作品をよく見ることからはじめ、「これは何だろう?」と一人ひとりに考えることを促し、様々な意見を引き出しながら作品の見方を深めていく方法です。鑑賞者の「観察力」「批判的思考力」「コミュニケーション力」を育成する効果があり、ニューヨークの近代美術館(MoMA)の教育部長であったフィリップ・ヤノウィン氏と認知心理学者のアビゲイル・ハウゼン氏が開発し、広めたものです。日本へは90年代から、この元となっている対話を通した鑑賞スタイルが紹介されてきました。誰かと話をしながら作品を見ていくことは、私たちも日常からしている自然なことのようですが、それを単なる「会話」ではなく、意見が積み重なっていく「対話」にしていくところがこの手法のポイントと言えます。

 

概要説明の後は、実際にVTSを体験。スクリーンに映された絵画や彫刻作品をじっくり見て、気づいたことや発見したことを進行役の三ツ木さんのもと自由に発言していきます。描かれているモチーフについてや作品から受ける印象など、様々な意見が飛び交いました。

 

3つ目に鑑賞した作品は、現在都美にて開催している「東京都美術館ものがたり」にも出品されている岡本太郎の「森の掟」でした。スクリーンでの鑑賞の後は、実際に展示室へ移動し本物を鑑賞。スクリーンとは違った発見も多くあったようで、鑑賞後の意見共有でも様々な意見が出ました。

アメリカで開発されたVTSですが、アメリカは国土が広く、なかなか美術館に行くことが出来ないという人も多くいます。そのような状況の中で生まれた作品鑑賞が、今回行ったようにスクリーンへの投影やスライド等を利用する方法です。スライドで出来ることも沢山あるが、実物を前にするとより深く鑑賞出来るということを実感しました。

VTSを体験した後は、具体的な方法等について等、より詳しい概要の説明がありました。

 

このVTSを行うにあたって要となるのが、鑑賞の進行役であるファシリテーターです。ファシリテーターは鑑賞者に問いかけをしながら、上手くその場の流れをつくり意見の共有を促していきます。例えば、鑑賞者が子供である場合、言葉がまだ拙く意図が伝わらないとこもあります。発言の真意を汲み取り言い換えたりすることで、他の人との意見の共有がされやすくなります。また、ファシリテーターが行う大事なことの一つとして「中立性を保つこと」があります。VTSはひとつの「正解」ではなく「思考する」ことを学ぶプロセスを重視しています。あがった意見を断定するのではなくひとつの可能性として扱うのです。大事なのは自分の意見をまず言う事で、作品について考えることを個々の中で育つようにします。そしてまた、鑑賞の最後は意見をまとめたり要約するという事はしません。もやもや感が生まれそうですが、ファシリテーターの進行のもと、自分の意見を客観的に言葉にすることで認識し、他の人の意見も受け止めると、さらに自ら今目にしているものの意味を生成したい!つまり自ら「知りたい」「わかりたい」という内発的な思いが鑑賞者の内側に育っていくようになります。さらには、その内発的な思いが強まれば、もやもやとした疑問を他人に答えを求める形で投げ出さないで自分の中に持ち続ける「自ら考え続ける力」も育まれていくのです。

アートは言葉にするには難しい分野でもありますが、他の人の考えを聞く事、また、自分の感じたことを言葉にして誰かと共有できたという充足感は、考え学び続ける力や観察すること、またコミュニケーション能力を育んでいきます。講座の最後には3人一組になって今回の体験や意見を共有しました。

 

とびコーのみなさんは14回の講座の後に、こどもたちと対話をする実践の場に立ちます。美術館に来るのは初めてという生徒も大勢いるでしょう。とびラーさんが対話による鑑賞のファシリテータとして活躍し、こどもたちと一緒に充実した時間を過ごす、その日が今から楽しみです。

(とびらプロジェクト アシスタント 大谷郁)

カレンダー

2012年7月
« 6月   8月 »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

アーカイブ

カテゴリー